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【情報】Taiwan primaries highlight fears over China’s political influence

樓主 三十二朔月 shingetsu
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Taiwan primaries highlight fears over China’s political influence

[color=rgba(27, 27, 27, 0.65098)]Pro-Beijing media credited with Han Kuo-Yu’s victory to lead opposition in presidential election

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Supporters of China-friendly Han Kuo-yu celebrate after he won his party's primary © AP
To the viewers of Taiwanese television channel CTiTV and its sister channel CTV, Monday was one big party.
Within minutes of Han Kuo-yu’s victory over Terry Gou, the founder of Apple supplier Foxconn, in the opposition Kuomintang (KMT) presidential primaries, footage of his supporters frantically waving national flags and firecrackers going off began flashing across TV screens.
Only national news related to Mr Han was reported that day: a drumming troupe organised by his fans made the cut, but the visit of incumbent President Tsai Ing-wen to Taiwan’s diplomatic allies in the Caribbean did not.
The focus on the victory by the China-friendly Mr Han, the populist mayor of Taiwan’s second-biggest city Kaohsiung, was not a one-off. Over the past year, the two TV channels have given the 62-year-old former lawmaker nonstop coverage, helping to create the “Han Wave” — a craze that transformed a politician seen as past his prime into a resurgent star.
But the effusive coverage has become a national security issue for the government of Ms Tsai, who Mr Han is set to challenge in a general electionnext January. The channels belong to the Want Want China Times Group, a media company influenced by the Chinese government, raising concerns about the growing influence of Beijing in the island’s politics.
“China has stretched its hands into our democratic politics and into the heart of it, our media,” said Chiu Chui-cheng, deputy minister of the Mainland Affairs Council, Taiwan’s cabinet-level policy body that deals with China affairs.
The People’s Republic of China has claimed Taiwan as its territory and threatened to annex it ever since the KMT lost the Chinese civil war in 1949 and fled to the island. But alongside military threats, Beijing is increasingly trying to influence Taiwan from within.
Taiwanese investors in China were an early target, among them Tsai Eng-meng, the founder of Want Want, a food conglomerate with large operations on the mainland. In 2001, Newslink Investment, a company based in the British Virgin Islands backed by Chinese investors, paid $37m for a stake in Want Want.
Beijing has long leaned on Taiwanese businesspeople in China to support the KMT, which — unlike Ms Tsai’s Democratic Progressive party — shares its view that Taiwan is part of a broader Chinese nation.
But in Mr Tsai’s case, Beijing used its clout to influence Taiwan’s freewheeling media. In 2006, Want Want acquired CTV, and in 2008 the China Times and CTiTV. Since then, China Times has morphed from a mainstream publication into what critics call a mouthpiece of the Chinese Communist party.
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Over the past year, two TV channels have given Mr Han nonstop coverage © AFP
Journalists working at the China Times and CTiTV told the Financial Times that their editorial managers take instructions directly from the Taiwan Affairs Office, the body in Chinese government that handles Taiwan issues.
“They call every day,” said one China Times reporter. “They don’t meddle in everything, mainly topics related to cross-Strait relations and to China. They have a say in the angle of the story, and whether it goes on the front page.”
The Want Want China Times Group did not respond to a request for comment on the practices and to requests for interviews with executives for this story.
A CTiTV journalist said Chinese government officials would “organise” China coverage by assigning stories and editorial positions to China-based correspondents of a range of Taiwanese media — an allegation corroborated by reporters at two Taiwanese newspapers.
The Chinese Communist party’s voice has proliferated across the island’s media sphere. Last week Lin Yu-tsang, a citizen journalist, revealed that two dozen little-known Taiwanese news websites were republishing reports verbatim from China Taiwan Web, a propaganda website of the Taiwan Affairs Office.
A media gathering hosted by the CCP two months ago threw a spotlight on the relationship between Taiwan’s media bosses and the party. The 70 Taiwanese media executives roared with laughter when Wang Yang, a member of the CCP’s Central Standing Committee, mocked the Taiwanese government. Mr Wang then told them they needed to help implement Beijing’s playbook for Taiwan. “Now as we want to realise ‘peaceful unification, one country, two systems’, we need to rely on the joint efforts with our friends in the media,” he said. “I believe you understand the situation. History will remember you.”
Those critical of China fear that Beijing’s task for its Taiwanese media allies is to make Mr Han president. Although Mr Han rejects allegations that he is Beijing’s candidate, there are signs of a Want Want China Times campaign to get him elected.
Before last November’s election in Kaohsiung, a DPP stronghold, the media group sent several dozen reporters and editorial managers to the city to help push his campaign. “There is a task force in the editorial department for working on ‘Han Kuo-yu frozen garlic’,” a CTiTV journalist told the Financial Times, using a pun that means getting elected.
The Taiwanese government is trying to push back. In March, the media regulator fined CTiTV NT$1m (US$32,000) for violations of broadcasting law, including giving too much air time to stories about Mr Han, which it said violated the principle of fairness and balance.
Last month, thousands of Taiwanese marched to protest against “red” media making inroads in their country. The DPP is now looking to turn such fears into a campaign issue: it is planning a series of discussion events on the topic of red media influence.
For Mr Han, the media support that has got him so far could yet turn into a political liability.
https://www.ft.com/content/036b609a-a768-11e9-984c-fac8325aaa04
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2 樓 只是個柳丁(´ ・ω ・`) ra45388791
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我們有請GOOGLE小姐
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3 樓 讚美太陽↖( ̄  ̄)↗ ab123654789
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Too long
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4 樓 王叔叔 jim1106
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作者標示-非商業性

本授權條款允許使用者重製、散布、傳輸以及修改著作,但不得為商業目的之使用。使用時必須按照著作人指定的方式表彰其姓名。

前提是我們必須看得懂。
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5 樓 fasffsdh deepvovo
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這誰看的懂 有病ㄛ
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6 樓 幻星 maxliao1027
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所以還是 Han先生的新聞
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7 樓 3594712 d31659575
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But not everyone reads English




at least I don't
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8 樓 狄亞特 suc60105
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作者標示-非商業性

本授權條款允許使用者重製、散布、傳輸以及修改著作,但不得為商業目的之使用。使用時必須按照著作人指定的方式表彰其姓名。

Chinese plz
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9 樓 aegis1985
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Please post Chinese ver.

Here is Taiwan
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10 樓 戰讚顫-__点占占人 a61456711
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11 樓 希格sigglas windyheart
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Hello google
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12 樓 騷毀 koo220xx
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要花上一段時間去看了
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13 樓 Fantastic Jamessong414
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這篇主要在說,

中天內部有記者爆料他們新聞(尤其與兩岸相關的)每天都受到國台辦的指示與操縱,
譬如什麼上頭版,用什麼角度報導等等的.

節錄部分內容:
Journalists working at the China Times and CTiTV told the Financial Times that their editorial managers take instructions directly from the Taiwan Affairs Office, the body in Chinese government that handles Taiwan issues.
“They call every day,” said one China Times reporter. “They don’t meddle in everything, mainly topics related to cross-Strait relations and to China. They have a say in the angle of the story, and whether it goes on the front page.”

雖然這已幾乎是可想而知的但...
新聞報導也要證據的吧= =?
這種匿名的到時被告,
審理中提不出來源,
就會像小三風波一樣喔~
變假新聞.

還有樓主你好像不能這樣直接貼FT的整篇報導喔,
他們是要訂閱才能看的(像現在台灣的蘋果).
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未登入的勇者,要加入 14 樓的討論嗎?
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